Pura Vida Travels - A Guide To Travel In Latin America








For nearly a year we have been waiting for a visa for my wife so she can come to the United States. If you're interested in how this convoluted process works you can read the whole story here. Because the process had been taking a ridiculously long time we had involved Senator Spector's office in order to help speed it up. On Wednesday morning I got a surprise email stating that my wifes long awaited interview at the embassy would be on Friday at 7:30 in the morning. Because our interview had been unexpectedly expedited we had to run to the embassy and pick up some paperwork then find an "embassy approved" doctor to give my wife a medical exam. One thing I learned in the process is that you're not allowed to take pictures of the embassy even from the OUTSIDE. I knew cameras weren't allowed inside but I was rather sternly admonished for taking the photos below.
Waiting In Line At The Embassy
Waiting In Line At The Embassy
The Schedule
The Schedule
My Bodygaurd
My Bodygaurd

We found a doctor at the hospital Vivian Pellas that was approved by the embassy and went there for the medical exam. My wife had to have a chest x-ray ($20), an AIDS test ($15), and a full medical exam ($265) from the doctor complete with 4 seperate injections. The good news was my wife passed with flying colors, the bad news was she looked like a pin cushion when she was done and wasn't a happy camper about all the shots.

After the doctors visit we went to lunch at Pizza Hut. The only reason I wanted to mention this is that I took a picture in the bathroom of the mouthwash dispenser. The reason I find these slightly amusing is that they have them in just about every restaurant bathroom in Managua. What you need to appreciate is only about 1 in 10 Nicas washes their hands after going to the bathroom. (I notice this because it's something that really grosses me out.) Although their hands are covered with god knows what I guess at least they have fresh breath.

Just in case you're interested, my wifes visa was approved on Friday so on 12/31/2008 she will officially become a legal "conditional resident" of the United States of America. It's been a long journey and we're both thankful that we can finally be together permanently.


Hospital Vivian Pellas
Hospital Vivian Pellas
View From The Hospital
View From The Hospital
We Dont Wash Our Hands But
We Dont Wash Our Hands But
Junietts Battle Scars
Junietts Battle Scars
Everyone Against Ortega
Everyone Against Ortega
All Against Ortega
All Against Ortega
Tihany
Tihany
Tihany
Tihany
Tihany
Tihany
Where The Pottery Is Made
Where The Pottery Is Made
Pottery Shop
Pottery Shop
Pretty Street
Pretty Street
Potter Statue
Potter Statue
The Doctors Office
The Doctors Office
Lots Of Pottery
Lots Of Pottery
Wind Chimes
Wind Chimes
The Porno Store
The Porno Store
The Church
The Church

We took our pottery shopping trip to San Juan de Oriente on Saturday morning. In Masaya, however, I've noticed many times a sign saying "Visit Tisma" so we decided to go check it out. I have no idea what is supposed to be there but whatever it is we never did find it.


Artists For The PLC
Artists For The PLC
Visit Tisma
Visit Tisma
Where The Hell Is It
Where The Hell Is It
My Wifes Bar
My Wifes Bar
Gift From Luxemburg
Gift From Luxemburg
Zona Franca
Zona Franca
Massive Zona Franca
Massive Zona Franca
Another Zona Franca
Another Zona Franca
Tribute To Thieves
Tribute To Thieves

Seeing as how it was the day before the elections security was as tight as I've ever seen it in Managua. Every bridge had special forces on it, areas around government buildings were restricted, and there were more cops out in Managua than I've ever seen. It was clear the government was preparing for something. What they were preparing for would become readily apparent on election day.

Guarding The Bridge
Guarding The Bridge
PLC In The Trees
PLC In The Trees


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