Pura Vida Travels - A Guide To Travel In Latin America








On Saturday we made a pilgramage to another of Juniett's relatives fincas. I swear, I'll be going to Nicaragua for 20 years before I meet all of the relatives. Families are huge in Nicaragua. Everyone seems to have 10 brothers and sisters and hundreds of cousins, aunts, uncles, etc. It's unbelievable how well all of them treat me. Whatever they have is mine as well whenever I'm there. It's very humbling and it definately keeps my life in the proper perspective. When I have the "woe is me's" all I have to do is think back to my times in Nicaragua to realize how good I have it.

Juniett Wants A Baby
Juniett Wants A Baby
Dont Eat The Baby
Dont Eat The Baby
Happy Baby
Happy Baby
Another Nephew
Another Nephew
No Shortage Of Kids
No Shortage Of Kids
Everyone Holds The Baby
Everyone Holds The Baby
Villa Sandino, Nicaragua
Villa Sandino, Nicaragua
Enormous Tree
Enormous Tree
Nice Scenery
Nice Scenery

The "town" we were headed to was called Palmires (not sure on the spelling) and you won't find it on any map. It's either in Chontales or the Southern Autonomous Region of Nicaragua but no one was really sure. The drive takes about 2 hours from Acoyapa with the first 45 minutes on the paved road heading to Neuva Guinea. After that it's a dirt road that winds through the Nicaraguan jungle. Although it's a dirt road, by Nicaraguan standards it's in pretty good shape.

The picture below title "Who Are You?" pretty much sums up Nicaraguan hospitality. About an hour and half into the trip I had to go to the bathroom realllllly bad and the people that lived in that kids house let me use their bathroom. They had a little store in the front of their house so we bought a bunch of stuff to repay them for their kindness.


A Farm Show
A Farm Show
The Water Truck
The Water Truck
Scary Bridge
Scary Bridge
Road To The Finca
Road To The Finca
Who Are You
Who Are You?
Church In Palmires
Church In Palmires
Road To The Finca
Road To The Finca
Cows Relaxing
Cows Relaxing
Is There A Finca Here
Is There A Finca Here
Out Of The Way
Out Of The Way
The Corral
The Corral
Loading Up The Milk
Loading Up The Milk

When we finally reached the end of the road Juniett's uncle and a few cousins were there waiting. They had just dropped off a load of milk and were happy to see us. From there we left the car and walked the rest of the way to the finca since there aren't any roads. It's about an hour walk through the jungle and it's not an easy hike. You have to cross streams, climb through barbed wire fences, etc. to make your way there.


The Road Ends Here
The Road Ends Here
Gearing Up
Gearing Up
Almost Ready
Almost Ready
No Horse For Me
No Horse For Me
Strong Horse
Strong Horse
The Trek Begins
The Trek Begins
A Little Muddy
A Little Muddy
Crossing The Stream
Crossing The Stream
Plenty Of Bamboo
Plenty Of Bamboo
Crawling Through Barbed Wire
Crawling Through Barbed Wire
More Barbed Wire
More Barbed Wire
Not Much Out Here
Not Much Out Here
Break Time
Break Time
Hurry Up People
Hurry Up People
Burned Out Area
Burned Out Area

I should mention that it was brutally hot and humid the day we were there. This time of year (Late May) it rains just about every afternoon in Nicaragua and when combined with the tropical heat it makes it feel like you're in a sauna. When we finally arrived at the finca I was informed that Juniett's uncle was going to slaughter a goat for our dinner later that evening so I know one of the residents (the goat) wasn't all that happy to see us.


Greber Takes A Rest
Greber Takes A Rest
The Finca
The Finca
The Bunkhouse
The Bunkhouse
Not Many Neighbors
Not Many Neighbors
Unhappy Goat
Unhappy Goat
They Have Cows
They Have Cows
Climb A Tree For A Cell Signal
Climb A Tree For A Cell Signal
Spacious Spread
Spacious Spread
 My Future Dinner
My Future Dinner
Monkeys
Monkeys
The Goats Going Down
The Goats Going Down
The Horse Gets A Rest
The Horse Gets A Rest

Finca's in Nicaragua are about as basic a dwelling as you will find anywhere. There is no running water, no sewage system, no electricity, basically, not much other than the essentials of life. This finca, however, did have their own ingenious power plant consisting of a car battery rigged to some electrical outlets. This provides enough power for a small TV and a radio. Of course, they only get 1 TV channel and it's like watching a football game in Buffalo with all the snow but hey, it's better than nothing.

Being an American I was bored after about 7 minutes at the finca so I decided to go out and do a little exploring in the jungle by myself. This was probably not one of the brighter things I've ever done in my life because I went pretty far and I didn't tell anyone that I was leaving. Upon later reflection I really had no idea what kind of animals I might run into or worse yet people. Strangers wandering around in the jungle aren't generally considered welcome guests in the jungles of Nicaragua. Fortunately, nothing happened and I got some nice photos as well.


Straw Saddle Pad
Straw Saddle Pad
The Power Plant
The Power Plant
Finca In Palmires, Nicaragua
Finca In Palmires, Nicaragua
What Are U Lookin At
What Are U Lookin At
Its Pretty Here
Its Pretty Here
I Found A Horse
I Found A Horse
Some Kind Of Nest
Some Kind Of Nest
Exploring The Jungle
Exploring The Jungle
Cool Palm Tree
Cool Palm Tree

When I finally returned to the finca I found my wife relaxing in a hammock and got a lecture about going off into the jungle alone.

Nasty Thorns
Nasty Thorns
Need A Date
Need A Date
Cowboy Haircut
Cowboy Haircut
Fresh Pineapple
Fresh Pineapple
Juniett Relaxing
Juniett Relaxing
Chelseas Bored
Chelseas Bored


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